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Corona Virus - Covid-19 - General Advice for Parents from Public Health

Thursday 26th March 2020

Supporting Children in Times of Worry - Advice from Warrington Borough Council

Latest Guidance from Public Health

Wednesday 25th March 2020

PARENT FACTSHEET

How to support home learning

Follow this guidance to create a positive learning environment at home

Be realistic about what you can do 

  • You're not expected to become teachers and your children aren't expected to learn as they do in school. Simply providing your children with some structure at home will help them to adapt. Use the tips below to help you make this work for your household
  • Experiment in the first week, then take stock. What's working and what isn't? Ask your children, involve them too
  • Share the load if there are 2 parents at home. Split the day into 2-3 hour slots and take turns so you can do your own work
  • Take care of your own health and wellbeing. This will be new for your entire household, so give it time to settle. Take a look at the links at the end of this factsheet for some advice on mental health and wellbeing

 

 

Keep to a timetable wherever possible

  • Create and stick to a routine if you can. This is what children are used to. For example, eat breakfast at the same time and make sure they're dressed before starting the ‘school’ day – avoid staying in pyjamas!
  • Involve your children in setting the timetable where possible. It’s a great opportunity for them to manage their own time better and it’ll give them ownership
  • Check in with your children and try to keep to the timetable, but be flexible. If a task/activity is going well or they want more time, let it extend where possible
  • If you have more than 1 child at home, consider combining their timetables. For example, they might exercise and do maths together – see what works for your household
  • Designate a working space if possible, and at the end of the day have a clear cut-off to signal school time is over
  • Stick the timetable up on the wall so everyone knows what they should be doing when, and tick activities off throughout the day
  • Distinguish between weekdays and weekends, to separate school life and home life

 

 

Make time for exercise and breaks throughout the day

  • Start each morning with a PE lesson at 9am with Joe Wicks

Start each afternoon with Tedfit – our own Teddy Hastings has set up his own work out at       https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGo5BAQ9pkg

 

  • If you have a garden, use it regularly. If you don’t, try to get out once a day as permitted by the government (households can be together outdoors but 2 metres apart from others)
  • Get your children to write in a diary what they did each day – this can be a clear sign that the ‘school’ day has ended

Other activities to keep children engaged throughout the day

  • Where you have more freedom in the timetable, make time for other activities. Add some creative time or watch a dance video from Go Noodle to get the heart-rate going
  • Get your children to write postcards to their grandparents or to pen pals
  • Ask grandparents to listen to your children read on FaceTime (or ask grandparents to read to younger children)
  • Give them chores to do so they feel more responsible about the daily routine at home
  • Ask them to help you cook and bake 
  • Accept that they'll probably watch more TV/spend time on their phone – that's ok but you might want to set/agree some screen time limits

 

 

An example of home-learning timetables

ACTIVITY

Suggested length of time

Possible activities

Activities set by my teacher

1 hour

Every day log on to Active Learn to complete online and paper based activities set by your teacher

Spellings

10 mins

Look cover write check, write in a sentence, spelling test, mnemonics, etc.  See your year group word list for what you need to practice.

Timetables/ number bonds etc

10 mins

Online games, paper based or quiz from parent/brother etc. See on-line Class Pages  or handout for what your year group needs to practice.

Exercise

At least 10 mins

Joe Wicks https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3LPrhI0v-w

Go noodle https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2YBT7HYqCbbvzu3kKZ3wnw

Just dance – youtube just dance

Or play wii fit or just dance if you have one

Practice mindfulness

Spanish

10 mins

https://www.duolingo.com/

get an adult to create a free account and practise 10 mins a day

Life skills

20 mins

Learn a new skill eg knitting, tie your shoelaces, whittling, cooking, sewing, calligraphy, telling the time etc.

Read for pleasure

20 mins

Read a book, comic or magazine

Create

At least 30 mins

Do something creative – draw, dance, sing, paint, write a poem make something etc

Fresh air

At least 30  mins

Go outside into the garden and get some fresh air if possible. Play football, go for a run, walk a dog, ride your bike, go for a walk etc if you are allowed

Do something for someone else!

20 mins

Help your family e.g. Lay the table, tidy your bedroom, help a sibling, read a story to a younger relative, make dinner, wash up etc.

Do something fun

At least an hour

Do something you enjoy and makes you happy each day – play, watch TV, read etc.

Connect with others

20 mins

Skype, phone, text, email, write a letter or go on social media to connect with family and friends, especially elderly

 

Parent Fact sheet & Suggested Timetable

Tuesday 24th March 2020

 

Hello all, 

 

Please find the latest Government Guidance below:-

 

As a country, we all need to do what we can to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus. That is why the government has given clear guidance on self-isolationhousehold isolation and social distancing.

 

And the most recent scientific advice on how to further limit the spread of COVID-19 is clear. If children can stay safely at home, they should, to limit the chance of the virus spreading.

 

That is why the government has asked parents to keep their children at home, wherever possible, and asked schools to remain open only for those children who absolutely need to attend.

 

It is important to underline that schools, all childcare settings (including early years settings, childminders and providers of childcare for school-age children), colleges and other educational establishments, remain safe places for children. But the fewer children making the journey to school, and the fewer children in educational settings, the lower the risk that the virus can spread and infect vulnerable individuals in wider society.

 

Schools, and all childcare providers, are therefore being asked to continue to provide care for a limited number of children - children who are vulnerable, and children whose parents are critical to the Covid-19 response and cannot be safely cared for at home.

 

Vulnerable children include children who are supported by social care, those with safeguarding and welfare needs, including child in need plans, on child protection plans, ‘looked after’ children, young carers, disabled children and those with education, health and care (EHC) plans.

 

We know that schools will also want to support other children facing social difficulties, and we will support head teachers to do so.

 

Parents whose work is critical to the COVID-19 response include those who work in health and social care and in other key sectors outlined below. Many parents working in these sectors may be able to ensure their child is kept at home. And every child who can be safely cared for at home should be.

 

Please, therefore, follow these key principles:

  1. If it is at all possible for children to be at home, then they should be.
  2. If a child needs specialist support, is vulnerable or has a parent who is a critical worker, then educational provision will be available for them.
  3. Parents should not rely for childcare upon those who are advised to be in the stringent social distancing category such as grandparents, friends, or family members with underlying conditions.
  4. Parents should also do everything they can to ensure children are not mixing socially in a way which can continue to spread the virus. They should observe the same social distancing principles as adults.
  5. Residential special schools, boarding schools and special settings continue to care for children wherever possible.

 

If your work is critical to the COVID-19 response, or you work in one of the critical sectors listed below, and you cannot keep your child safe at home then your children will be prioritised for education provision:

Health and social care

This includes but is not limited to doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers; the support and specialist staff required to maintain the UK’s health and social care sector; those working as part of the health and social care supply chain, including producers and distributers of medicines and medical and personal protective equipment.

 

Education and childcare

This includes childcare, support and teaching staff, social workers and those specialist education professionals who must remain active during the COVID-19 response to deliver this approach.

 

Key public services

This includes those essential to the running of the justice system, religious staff, charities and workers delivering key frontline services, those responsible for the management of the deceased, and journalists and broadcasters who are providing public service broadcasting.

 

Local and national government

This only includes those administrative occupations essential to the effective delivery of the COVID-19 response, or delivering essential public services, such as the payment of benefits, including in government agencies and arms length bodies.

 

Food and other necessary goods

This includes those involved in food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery, as well as those essential to the provision of other key goods (for example hygienic and veterinary medicines).

 

Public safety and national security

This includes police and support staff, Ministry of Defence civilians, contractor and armed forces personnel (those critical to the delivery of key defence and national security outputs and essential to the response to the COVID-19 pandemic), fire and rescue service employees (including support staff), National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas.

 

Transport

This includes those who will keep the air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes operating during the COVID-19 response, including those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass.

 

Utilities, communication and financial services

This includes staff needed for essential financial services provision (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure), the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage), information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the COVID-19 response, as well as key staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 critical services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors.

If workers think they fall within the critical categories above, they should confirm with their employer that, based on their business continuity arrangements, their specific role is necessary for the continuation of this essential public service.

 

If your school is closed, then please contact your local authority, who will seek to redirect you to a local school in your area that your child, or children, can attend.

We are grateful for the work of teachers and workers in educational settings for continuing to provide for the children of the other critical workers of our country. It is an essential part of our national effort to combat this disease.

WHAT DOES 'STAYING AT HOME' MEAN?

 

If anyone remains uncertain about what 'staying at home' means then please read the government guidance which has been, and still is readily available on the internet.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection  

 

Government guidance about staying at home is this...

 

Stay at home

You and all household members should remain at home. Do not go to work, school, or public areas, and do not use public transport or taxis.

 

If possible, you should not go out even to buy food or other essentials, other than exercise, and in that case at a safe distance from others. The 14-day period starts from the day the first person in your house became ill.

If you require help with buying groceries, other shopping or picking up medication, or walking a dog, you will need to ask friends or relatives. Alternatively, you can order medication by phone or online. You can also order your shopping online. Make sure you tell delivery drivers to leave items outside for collection if you order online. The delivery driver should not come into your home.

Friday 20th March  2020

 

Dear Parents/Carers

Firstly, I hope you and your families are well and are staying as positive as you can under these challenging circumstances. 

 

What is clear to all is Government advice that if children can stay safely at home, they should do to limit the chance of the virus spreading.  So today will be the last day in school for the majority of children.

We will remain open for those children who absolutely need to attend. The fewer children making the journey to school, and the fewer children in educational settings, the lower the risk that the virus can spread and infect vulnerable individuals in wider society.

We will able to continue to provide care for a limited number of children and this will be restricted to the Government’s definition of key workers, this is shared below:-

We will follow the Government’s key principles that if it is at all possible for children to be at home, then they should be.

 

KEY WORKERS

If you work in one of the critical sectors identified below, and you cannot keep your child safe at home then your children will be prioritised.

 

  • Health and social care - doctors, nurses, midwives, paramedics, social workers, care workers, and other frontline health and social care staff including volunteers etc

 

  • Education and childcare - nursery and teaching staff, social workers and specialist education professionals

 

  • Key public services - justice system, religious staff, charities and workers delivering key frontline services, management of the deceased, and journalists and broadcasters

 

  • Local and national government – essential administrative occupations such as the payment of benefits, including in government agencies and arms-length bodies.
  • Food and other necessary goods - food production, processing, distribution, sale and delivery as well as those essential to the provision of other key goods (for example hygienic and veterinary medicines).
  • Public safety and national security - police and support staff, Ministry of Defence civilians, contractor and armed forces personnel, fire and rescue service employees, National Crime Agency staff, those maintaining border security, prison and probation staff and other national security roles, including those overseas.
  • Transport- air, water, road and rail passenger and freight transport modes including those working on transport systems through which supply chains pass.
  • Utilities, communication and financial services - essential financial (including but not limited to workers in banks, building societies and financial market infrastructure), the oil, gas, electricity and water sectors (including sewerage), information technology and data infrastructure sector and primary industry supplies to continue during the COVID-19 response, as well as key staff working in the civil nuclear, chemicals, telecommunications (including but not limited to network operations, field engineering, call centre staff, IT and data infrastructure, 999 and 111 critical services), postal services and delivery, payments providers and waste disposal sectors.

I would like to emphasise again that, if you as a key worker are able to ensure your child is safely cared for at home, they should be.

So, please can parents contact school (by email) as soon as possible to let us know if their occupation is included above and you need your child to attend school.  Please state your occupation in your email. 

 

Parents who have already contacted us yesterday and have received acknowledgment do not need to contact us again, thank you for your response.

 

We will be working today to finalise arrangements and I will write to all parents again later today.

 

I am confident that you will all continue to support each other as much as you can, take care

 

Mrs Fryman

Letter for Parents - Changes in School 19.3.2020

Flow Chart - What should you do? (This advice is updated daily)

Wednesday 18th March 2020

 

Parents & Carers

 

CORONAVIRUS – UPDATE

 

I hope you and your family are keeping well.   These are unprecedented times and I would like to reassure you that we are taking measures and realistic actions to ensure that we are doing our upmost to keep your child physically safe and we are also doing our best to ensure their mental health and well-being is as positive as it can be during this challenging time.

Until we are directly advised to close by the local Public Health England Health Protection Team, we plan to remain open and are putting extra precautions in place to protect children and staff from the risk of infection.

                                                   

I am writing to you to give you further information about how we are dealing with the key issues surrounding the COVID 19 virus:-

 

  • We have established a daily briefing meeting to ensure we have the latest available information from Public Health England and Warrington Borough Council and we are sharing this information with you daily on our school website and will advise you about any changes that affect children and families here -  

https://www.stmatthewsceprimary.com/corona-virus-covid-19-general-advice-for-parents-f/   

 

  • We are also communicating with you via the usual email and notification system and by our school newsletter

 

  • We have cancelled, or postponed non-essential meetings – where we can we will do business in a different way, rather than a face-to-face meeting

 

  • We have cancelled, or postponed some school events to which parents and our local community were invited (e.g. class assemblies) – please see newsletter

 

  • We have cancelled all trips (e.g. Class R’s visit to Manchester Airport) until May 2020

 

  • We have reviewed our after school provision and, in line with the other schools in our local cluster, have made the decision to continue to offer after school clubs run by ‘outside providers’.  We will continue to regularly review this provision and will keep you informed of any changes so that you can make alternative child-care arrangements if necessary

 

  • We are cleaning and disinfecting regularly touched objects and surfaces more often than usual using our cleaning products

 

  • We are supervising children to ensure they wash their hands for 20 seconds - more often than usual - with soap and water or hand sanitizer and we are reminding them to catch coughs and sneezes in tissues

 

  • We are talking to children about coronavirus in a calm and age-appropriate way, using reliable sources (eg BBC Newsround, First News)

 

  • If we hear pupils (or parents) spreading rumours or misinformation about coronavirus, we will challenge it

 

Please take care everyone and stay safe.

 

Mrs H Fryman

Headteacher

Wednesday 18th March, 2020

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO TO HELP YOUR CHILD?

 

News of the COVID-19 virus is everywhere, from the front page of all the papers to the playground at school. Many parents are wondering how to bring up the pandemic in a way that will be reassuring and not make children more worried than they already may be. Here is some advice from the experts at the Child Mind Institute.

 

How can I respond to my child's Coronavirus anxiety?

The first response is perspective. While it's important to acknowledge that this situation does require monitoring and is going to increase the anxiety of both adults and children, keeping perspective is important.

 

Find Out What Your Child Already Knows

Ask age appropriate questions. For older children, you might ask, "Are people in school talking about coronavirus? What are they saying?" For younger children, you could say, "Have you heard grownups talking about a new sickness that's going around?" This gives you a chance to learn how much children know — and to find out if they're hearing the wrong informationFollow your child's lead. Some children may want to spend time talking. But if your children don't seem interested or don't ask a lot of questions, that's OK.

 

Offer Comfort — and Honesty

Focus on helping your child feel safe, but be truthful. Don't offer more detail than your child is interested in. For example, if children ask about school closings, address their questions. But if the topic doesn't come up, there's no need to raise it unless it happens.

 

Speak calmly and reassuringly. Explain that most people who get sick feel like they have a cold or the flu. Children pick up on it when parents worry. So when you talk about coronavirus and the news, use a calm voice and try not to seem upset.

 

Give children space to share their fears. It's natural for children to worry, "Could I be next? Could that happen to me?" Let your child know that children don’t seem to get as sick as adults. Let them know they can always come to you for answers or to talk about what scares them.

 

Know when they need guidance. Be aware of how your children get news and information, especially older children who go online. Point them to age-appropriate content so they don't end up finding news shows or outlets that scare them or have incorrect information.

 

Help children Feel in Control

Give your child specific things they can do to feel in control. Teach children that getting lots of sleep and washing their hands well and often can help them stay strong and well. Explain that regular hand washing also helps stop viruses from spreading to others. Be a good role model and let your children see you washing your hands often!

 

Talk about all the things that are happening to keep people safe and healthy. Young children might be reassured to know that hospitals and doctors are prepared to treat people who get sick. Older children might be comforted to know that scientists are working to develop a vaccine.

 

Put news stories in context. If they ask, explain that death from the virus is still rare, despite what they might hear. Watch the news with your kids so you can filter what they hear.

 

Children and teens often worry more about family and friends than themselves. For example, if children hear that older people are more likely to be seriously ill, they might worry about their grandparents. Letting them call or Skype with older relatives can help them feel reassured about loved ones.

 

Let your children know that it's normal to feel stressed out at times. Everyone does. Recognising these feelings and knowing that stressful times pass and life gets back to normal can help children build resilience.

 

Keep the Conversation Going

Keep checking in with your child. Use talking about coronavirus as a way to help children learn about their bodies, like how the immune system fights off disease.

 

Talk about current events with your children often. It's important to help them think through stories they hear about. Ask questions: What do you think about these events? How do you think these things happen? Such questions also encourage conversation about non-news topics.

 

The following video clips are also useful resources for children and we hope you will find them useful in the coming weeks.

 

Coronavirus: Your questions answered

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/51861089  

 

 Coronavirus: Here's some advice if you're worried about it

https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/51896156

Tuesday 17th March, 2020

 

Today's guidance from Public Health England 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection 

 

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of:

  • new continuous cough and/or
  • high temperature

For most people, coronavirus (COVID-19) will be a mild illness.

 

Main messages

  • if you live alone and you have symptoms of coronavirus illness (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home for 7 days from when your symptoms started. (See ending isolation section below for more information)
  • if you live with others and you or one of them have symptoms of coronavirus, then all household members must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the house became ill
  • it is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community
  • for anyone in the household who starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for 7 days from when the symptoms appeared, regardless of what day they are on in the original 14 day isolation period. (See ending isolation section below for more information
  • if you can, move any vulnerable individuals (such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of the home isolation period
  • if you cannot move vulnerable people out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible
  • if you have coronavirus symptoms:
    • do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital
    • you do not need to contact 111 to tell them you’re staying at home
    • testing for coronavirus is not needed if you’re staying at home
  • plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home and consider what can be done for vulnerable people in the household
  • ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home
  • wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser
  • if you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 7 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999

Monday 16th March 2020

 

Today, the Department for Education and Public Health England have issued updated guidance for education settings on COVID-19. This guidance will assist staff in addressing COVID-19 in educational settings. This includes childcare, schools, further and higher educational institutions.

What you need to know:

  • staff, young people and children should stay at home if they are unwell with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature to avoid spreading infection to others. Otherwise they should attend education or work as normal
  • if staff, young people or children become unwell on site with a new, continuous cough or a high temperature they should be sent home
  • clean and disinfect regularly touched objects and surfaces more often than usual using your standard cleaning products
  • supervise young children to ensure they wash their hands for 20 seconds more often than usual with soap and water or hand sanitiser and catch coughs and sneezes in tissues

The updated guidance can be found here:

Current advice remains in place: no education or children’s social care setting should close in response to a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case unless advised to do so by Public Health England.

The Chief Medical Officer has advised that the impact of closing schools on both children’s education and on the workforce would be substantial, but the benefit to public health may not be. Decisions on future advice to education or children’s social care settings will be taken based on the latest and best scientific evidence, which at this stage suggests children are a lower risk group.

 

Recording school pupil absences

Where a pupil is in self-isolation, in accordance with latest information and advice from Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England, the pupil should be recorded as unable to attend due to exceptional circumstances in the attendance register. Code Y (Unable to attend due to exceptional circumstances) should be used in this instance.

 

If a pupil does not attend school, despite the school operating as usual and the pupil is not self-isolating, they should be marked as absent. It is for headteachers to determine whether or not the absence is authorised depending on the individual circumstances.

 

Where a pupil cannot attend school due to illness, as normally would happen, the pupil should be recorded as absent in the attendance register and the school will authorise the absence. Code I (Illness) should be used in this instance.

Friday 13th March 2020

 

Further guidance has been received from Public Health England ...

 

Government announces move from Contain to Delay phase

Yesterday, the Government announced that we are moving from the Contain phase of the coronavirus action plan and into the Delay phase, in response to the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

Full details of each stage in the government action plan can be found here:

To support the delay of the spread of the virus, the Department for Health and Social Care has asked anyone who shows certain symptoms to stay at home for 7 days, regardless of whether they have travelled to affected areas. This means people should stay at home and avoid all but essential contact with others for 7 days from the point of displaying mild symptoms, to slow the spread of infection.

The symptoms are:

  • A high temperature (37.8 degrees and above)
  • A new, continuous cough

You do not need to call NHS 111 to stay at home. If your symptoms worsen during your stay at home period or are no better after 7 days contact NHS 111 online at 111.nhs.uk. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.

 

 

How to wash your hands properly

Wash your hands more often for 20 seconds with soap and hot water.
Watch this short NHS film for guidance:

Teach young children how to wash their hands with the NHS handwashing song:

Public Health England recommends that in addition to handwashing before eating, and after coughing and sneezing, everyone should also wash hands after using toilets and travelling on public transport.

Thursday 5th March 2020

 

The importance of hygiene

Yesterday, the Department of Health and Social Care launched a public information campaign that focuses on the importance of handwashing. Washing hands for 20 seconds is central to prevent and slow the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/public-information-campaign-focuses-on-handwashing

 

Department for Education Coronavirus helpline

On Monday we launched a new helpline to answer questions about COVID-19 related to education. Staff, parents and young people can contact the helpline as follows:

Phone: 0800 046 8687
Email: DfE.coronavirushelpline@education.gov.uk
Opening hours: 8am to 6pm (Monday to Friday)

Wednesday 4th March 2020

 

NHS 111 Online

Get coronavirus (COVID-19) advice

Find out what to do if:

  • you think you have symptoms
  • you might have been exposed to the virus when travelling

We'll ask you a few questions and tell you what to do next.

 

https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19

 

Friday 28th February 2020

 

Dear Parents, 

 

Please help and support us by ensuring you follow the correct advice for Coronavirus.   As you’re aware in this age of social media it is very easy for misinformation to circulate and for people to be misguided and frightened by unofficial sources and hearsay.

 

We will endeavour to send regular advice to you from Public Health England and would ask that you also keep yourself up to date by regularly checking their official website.  See link below:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/wuhan-novel-coronavirus-information-for-the-public

 

In terms of preventing the spread of the virus in schools advice from Public Health is that it is all about highlighting the good hygiene rules we already follow in schools i.e. frequent hand washing.  When sneezing, blow into a handkerchief or disposable tissue then wash your hands again. Increase cleaning of all furniture surfaces, door handles, equipment that is handled.    

 

Public Health say  that it is important to recognise that, at present, the risk of catching Coronavirus is minimal. Self-isolation is only required if staff or pupils have travelled to the areas outlined in the advice link for schools below:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-to-educational-settings-about-covid-19/guidance-to-educational-settings-about-covid-19

 

If they have travelled to a category 1 area within the last 14 days they should self-isolate and call NHS111 to inform them of recent travel and then follow their instructions, regardless of whether they have symptoms.

 

If they have travelled to a category 2 area within the last 14 days they are advised to self-isolate only if they develop symptoms.  If they are well they do not need to avoid contact with other people and can continue to attend work or education.

 

If they have not travelled to one of these areas they would only need to be self-isolated if they have had close contact with a confirmed case.  This would not be required for suspected cases.  For further detail on this please contact school for further advice.

 

Public Health have advised that the following symptoms may develop in the 14 days after exposure to someone who has Coronavirus:  - cough - difficulty in breathing – fever.

   

Generally, these infections can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease. There is no evidence that children are more affected than other age groups – very few cases have been reported in children.

  

Thank you for working with us to protect our school and pupils from Corona Virus and undue stress and anxiety.

Corona Virus - Latest Advice from Public Health

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